Common Lies on Resumes

November 15, 2017 by evalee140

Desperate times often call for desperate measures and it has been observed that in the existing brutal job market, an individual can go to any length to clinch the dream job. With the era in which even photographs are photoshopped to get more likes on social networking sites, how can a single-page resume be left behind? If you have ever been tempted to throw in some heavy words and falsify specific content on a resume just to project yourself as a better candidate, well you are not alone. The funny part is that today, it’s easier to verify a person’s work history and personal profile and yet even candidates don’t mind taking these risks. Nowadays, hiring managers and employers often do a background check to determine the potential of a candidate and thus can catch your cock-and-bull stories even before you utter a word at an interview. Here are the most widespread falsehoods in a resume.

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Tweaking employment dates:

The recession period often sees laying off of employees as most employers enter a cost-cutting mode. Also, personal life changes such as relocating to a new state, and family issues cause an individual to take a temporary break from work life. This tempts him or her to fudge work history and lies about employment dates just to cover up the gap. However, this can lead to uncomfortable situations as it is very easy to verify every word on the resume.



Fabricating educational qualifications:

Just to fit into the company criteria, stating you obtained a grade A despite even when you have actually received Grade C, is definitely not a good idea. It’s in fact, a red flag and would create a negative impression. Not only it would affect your selection, but also incite a legal action.

Including company names and accomplishments:

Businesses fail due to various reasons, but this does not prove you were not employed by a company in the past. You might have been ousted from a position for being irresponsible or making mistakes, but this does not mean you should include industry bigwigs just to make an impact. It’s not difficult to verify your employment with an organization, credentials or what kind of work you did, but including positions as reputed companies just to attract the attention of a hiring manager could be the final nail in the coffin.

Exaggerating job titles and responsibilities:

While applying for a higher position shows your ambitious nature, tweaking your earlier job title is always a blatant lie and can come back to haunt you. To get a pay raise or to show how competent you are for the position, enhancing job responsibilities or using lucrative words to tell about the positions you have handled would not help in making the mark. Hiring managers can just make a call to your previous employers or ask deep questions about the role and can even find you unequipped for the position if the answers are not as per expectations.

Over the board self-acclamation:

Even though self-bragging is common on a resume, knowing how far is too far is an important aspect of the entire process. It’s necessary to identify the thin line between fact and fiction, and just not blow your own trumpet for the purpose of self-promotion. Including phrases like ‘world-class leader’ or ‘First individual to carry out XYZ task’ can certainly invite more questions and lower your chances of making it to the next round unless you have some really satisfying answers.

References are the new and an easy way to get success in a job search. Coercing your best friend or ex-colleague to speak highly of you or providing fraudulent references indirectly convinces the prospective employer about your lies. While your nose won’t grow like the Italian fable character Pinocchio, speaking lies once may force you to carry its burden over the entire professional life or even cost you the job if the recruiter thinks things are too fishy to be true.

About Author: Eva started writing the blogs and articles on Resumes, Career oriented topics and other various topics too. Also, have a mastery of how to face an interview from Freshers to High Profile Jobs writings and is a contributor to BSR.